Sardines with coriander seeds: electric combo

Fresh sardine fillets Fresh sardine fillets

This recipe is super easy to do. All of the ingredients are healthy. The combination is delicious and electric will all the ground coriander. And it goes well with Pauillac (or southern French wines that give peppery spicy aromas)

Cutting the sardines into squares
Cutting the sardines into squares

Boil the rice in a bouillon scattered with the coriander grains- un-ground.

Mix in a large marinated artichoke heart with a little bit of olive oil. 

Sautée the fresh sardines with salt and pepper in a very hot frying pan with olive oil. You want to sear the skin to give bitterness to match the artichoke and to cut through the fat of the fish.

Sauté-ing the sardines with salt and pepper
Sauté-ing the sardines with salt and pepper

 

Rice with artichoke and fresh ground coriander seeds
Rice with artichoke and fresh ground coriander seeds

Both the rice and the fish will require lots of fresh ground coriander seeds to bring the artichokes and sardines into harmony with the spicy, peppery wine.

Final dish in a bowl
Final dish in a bowl

This Pauillac comes from the  Château   La Tour. 2004 is a good under-rated vintage and still affordable. This wine is the rock bottom level wine produced by this Premier Grand Cru Classé  Château   located in Pauillac (the appellation and village) in the sub region of Bordeaux named Medoc. Medoc is a peninsula north of the city of Bordeaux. The top-level wine is simply called  Château   La Tour. The mid level wine is Les Forts de La Tour. All that is not deemed good enough (but none the less very good) to go into the top wines is sold as straight Pauillac. It has a rather generic looking label, but in tiny print at the bottom some reference to its noble origin is mentioned. They don’t make this wine every year, but when they do, look for it. It’s a bargain!!

Pauillac 2004 Latour
Pauillac 2004 La Tour

The wine is spicy (peppery) and marked by pine forest aromas. In Bordeaux they talk of ‘la pinède’ which is a mixture of dried pine needles, wild cumin growing on the dunes just before you hit the Atlantic Ocean on the Medoc beaches. This is the ‘garrigue’ of Bordeaux at its best. A precise, complex, smooth textured wine with just enough bitterness for the grilled sardines and artichokes and spice and pinède for the coriander.

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